Ethiopia & The Lost Ark

Ark Of The Covenant

                                                                      Enigma: Ark Of The Covenant

The Ark of The Covenant is an enigma.

A symbol of the union between God and his ‘chosen’ people, it emanated a power and radiance that continues to fascinate us today.

According to the Bible, God directed Moses to build an Ark of the Covenant to hold the Ten Commandments and to serve as the Throne of God on Earth. Once completed, the Israelites carried the Ark with them during their 40 years spent wandering in the desert, and after the conquest of Canaan, it was brought to Shiloh.

King David later took the Ark to Jerusalem, where his son and successor, Solomon, eventually installed it in the Temple. Since its disappearance, some 2,000 years ago, numerous theories have arisen about its fate.

Ancient Alien Connections: An Electrical Capacitor Device

In the Book Of Exodus, there are very specific instructions on how to build the Ark of the Covenant.

It had to be made of hard Thorntree wood 45 inch long 27 inches wide and 27 inches deep, covered with pure gold lines inside and out. A solid gold mercy seat or lid was to be placed on top of the Ark, which perched two gold winged cherubs facing each other with their wings spread. Two wooden carrying poles were then passed through gold rings on both sides of the box to allow it to be carried safely.

Its been speculated that the Ark’s intricate design enabled it to generate static electricity. The Ark can therefore be understood as an electromagnetic currrent generating device i.e a Capacitor – an object that holds energy.

Energy that could be used as a weapon (e.g. at Jericho), or as a means of telecommunication (dialogue between Moses and God) and other miscellaneous uses including the production of Mannah, the mysterious heavenly food that nourished the Israelites during their sojourn in the desert.

Ark Throne

                                                                  God’s Throne In The Desert

The Ethiopian Connection

Isreal’s Levitical Priests may have moved the Ark to Egypt just before the Babylonians sacked Jerusalem in 586 B.C. From there it was supposedly moved to Ethiopia, where it resides to this day in the town of Axum, in the St. Mary of Zion Cathedral where only one man, a monk known as “the Guardian,” is allowed to see the Ark.

After extensive research in Africa for The Economist, British journalist Graham Hancock stepped forward with the assertion that he had found the exact location of the ark of the covenant. In his book, The Sign and Seal: The Quest for the Lost Ark of the Covenant, Hancock documents that the ark was removed from Solomon’s temple during the reign of Manasseh, transported to Elephantine Island along the Nile, and was finally placed in the Church of St. Mary Zion in the small town of Axum, Ethiopia, where it has existed to this day.

Ethiopian Jews however don’t necessarily agree with Hancock’s view of how the Ark came to their land. Certainly, they attest that the Ark is in their presence, but they document its arrival during the reign of King Solomon.

Ark Enclosure Ehtiopia

                                                Ark’s Resting Place: Axum Monastery Ethiopia

According to Ethiopian Jews, during the reign of Solomon, “The Queen of Sheba, having heard of Solomon’s fame, came to test him with subtle questions” (1 Kings 10:1). The Bible describes Sheba as “breathless” in witnessing Solomon’s wisdom, palace, and abundance of food. According to an Ethiopian manuscript, which translated means “The Glory of Kings,” Sheba seduced Solomon, eventually bearing him a son, named Menelik.

Menelik was educated by his father in Jerusalem and, upon reaching adulthood, left the city to rejoin his mother taking the ark of the covenant with him. Hancock discounts this theory stating that the ark arrived in Ethiopia nearly 500 years after “the Queen of Sheba’s famous visit to Jerusalem”.

Despite the differing opinions on how the Ark got to Ethiopia, its presence in Ethiopia is affirmed beyond question by the Ethiopian faithful.

Conclusion

Whether it was an Ancient Alien Electromagnetic device or simply an object of ritual veneration, the Lost Ark Of The Covenant continues to captivate our collective imagination.

The Ethiopian claim sounds as possible as all the other alternatives that have been advanced as the Ark’s final resting place such as Jerusalem and even Japan…Ultimately, the controversy will only ever end if the Ark is put on public display wherever it may be.

Our other feature article of the Week is an Interview with Leti Arts, Ghana’s exciting Pan-African Afrofuturist Mobile Games and Comic Book developer. The archive selection sees us staying in Ethiopia in celebration of Menelik II’s famous 1896 victory over the Italians at the Battle Of Adowa…The August Issue of our Bi-Monthly E-Magazine ‘Disclosure’ will be out at the end of July, and if you would like to get your hands on a copy, you can register and support us as a Patron.

Our featured Homepage Documentary of the Week is an Ancient Aliens episode on the Lost Ark of the Covenant.

Enjoy…One!

Links & Credits

Fate Of The Lost Ark Revealed?

The Ark: An Ancient Aliens Capacitor Device

Is The Ark Of The Covenant In Ethiopia?

Leti Arts Interview

Battle Of Adowa

 

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